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Privileged and Confidential

From Section – Ownership, Non-Disclosure and Media Relations (page 1) of the Pilot Contract - 

The AP exam, AP resource materials, this project and the works created as a part of the Pilot are owned by the College Board. As the concepts on which we will collaborate will be rooted in the proprietary work of the College Board, you will be expected to keep confidential, and to have your employees keep confidential, any information or material that is provided to you and designated as "confidential" by the College Board.

Schools’ comments regarding pilot secrecy:

  • Why can’t we talk about the pilot?
  • My school was not in the pilot, how would we of learned about these new changes?
  • Wouldn’t open dialog improve the pilot?
  • How can a non-profit that receives such an enormous amount of public funding not have transparency requirements about what they are planning for schools and students?

Please share your thoughts on how this affects your school community.

Mike Elings

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What's the big secret?  I hope we will continue to be able to register through Total Registration.  In general, our school and district find Collegeboard's sales pitches, ordering web sites, refusal to pay staff to administer the PSAT on Saturday, SSID approval requirements and customer service time consuming and substandard.  The handling of this pilot raises suspicion of an ulterior motive.

Hudnalld 0 votes
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I have been a counselor for 27 years, and was AP coordinator for 24 years.The College Board has slowly and insidiously created the "gold standard" for what excellence is supposed to look like. I mean, the initial line in the SAT  proctor's script says, "Good morning. Today you are going to take the SAT. This is your chance to show how prepared you are for college and career." Really, are you kidding me??!! The SAT trumps the transcript, the life experiences, the overall academic preparation, day in and day out in classes and internship opportunities??? The SAT is really the  student's "chance" to show how prepared they are????

The College Board has long since outlived its usefulness. Gone are the days when colleges tracked freshman grades and SAT scores to determine who would most likely be a fit for their institution in future admissions. They have set up a false measure of equity and excellence that makes every high school afraid that their score will go down from year to year. But what does it mean? It only indicates how many students got suckered into paying way too much money to take a test that means very little, and is based on a curriculum that is grossly out of touch with best practices in authentic learning and assessment. A number of years ago, we decided to stop doing Middle States. And do you know what happened? Nothing, except we didn't pay a large sum of money to jump through hoops to get a gold star. 

The time has really come to leverage dual credit opportunities for students through local colleges and online coursework, where they actually can earn college credits. The College Board is entirely about making money for themselves, and continue to create the facade that the are the be all, and end all of success in college. The have become the all-powerful Oz! And everyone is afraid to stop buying into their products, because the have created the false-narrative that they are essential to the college admissions process. The College Board is not interested in creating dialog, or even being relevant. They don't have to be, since they made the rules we all feel we have to follow. I wish I could be a non-profit like the College Board claims to be!

 

Daniel Barber 1 vote
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I completely agree with Daniel Barber's sentiments!  Our district (of 3 high schools) was lured into purchasing PSATs for every student in grades 8-11 and SAT for every senior two years in a row.  Besides the huge disruption of instruction for our already over-tested students, the cost to the district was exorbitant.  It was one of several financial blunders that are now responsible for staff cuts and building closures. The administrator who dragged us onto Collegeboard's bandwagon was all about the "gold star", but all it did was discourage our kids and lower the average SAT score on our school profile.  AP involves more work than it's worth, for the number of students who actually earn college credit.  If not for Total Registration, I don't know how we'd be able to handle it.

 

 

Hudnalld 0 votes
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I agree with the previously posted sentiments.  I never hesitate to express my honest thoughts and feelings to the CB at any opportunity presented to me as a school-based PSAT/SSD/AP coordinator, but they clearly don't care what I think.  The most recent concern I had was CB insisting that juniors send (CT school day) SAT score reports on the day of testing, or never again.  If the CB actually supported access, students would have no time limit on when they can use their four free score reports.  Another concern is that over the years, more time consuming work has been put on school personnel, clearly so the work conducted at CB requires less manpower.  I'm also concerned that they have expanded into the role of school counselors, and negatively affect our ability to provide information and advice to students with last minute changes or, again, changes that save them money, such as score reports only being available on line.  ARRGH!  

JUDITH NEDELL 0 votes
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